Fashion



Dear Reader,

The roles of women in the professional community is ripe with opportunities.   In order to promote much-needed role modeling, I had the opportunity to interview veteran Network Systems Administrator, Alice  Gorman.  Alice currently works for Boston International Inc. home of fine gifts from IHR USA, October Hill® and  The Metropolitan Museum of Art where “Great Art is the Difference®”.imagesCA79LA0P

  1. Is there a moment in your career that you remember as pivotal?  If so, what made it an important time?

Teaching a computer class for teenage girls at a church in Boston. What made it so important was when I realized a few of the girls were taking
two or three buses to get to class. Their excitement to learn really got me excited.

  1. After having a 20-year career, do you have anything you are still trying to accomplish?

I would love to learn more about the internet. SEO, web building, and all the secrets on creating a successful website.

  1. At the start of your career did you expect to be where you are now?

No, not at all. I started my career at a prepress and typography company in Cambridge, MA. I was running a mainframe system. We loading fonts using paper tape and printed out galleys of type. The art department used the galleys, exacto knives and wax to layout magazines for print. It’s amazing how my job has enhanced and changed with technology.

  1.  What has been the most startling development in the technical field in the last twenty years?

The internet with its unlimited services and resources.

5. Who are your role models or greatest influencers? Why?

Don Leamy coworker took me under his wing. He saw my potential and hired me as the system operator over 20+ years ago.

What do you least like to do in your job?

I really can’t think of what I like least about my job. Overall I’ve been very satisfied with my jobs.

7. What is the most fulfilling about your job?

I enjoy challenges. When problems or new projects arise I am always ready.  Because  the industry changes quickly. I have to stay up to date on emerging trends, sorting through what is important and deciding what will be best for the company.

8. Did you ever face a setback and how did you handle it?

Yes, but I utilize a setback as a challenge, a training, and a learning experience. I usually step back take a good look at the situation then figure out how I am going to conquer it. Setbacks help me to improve productivity by anticipating preventable problems.


danica_mckellar_580pxDear Reader,

I wish Danica McKellar’sMath Doesn’t Suck” had been around when I was young.  I wound up in a remedial math class in the sixth grade because I believed that I was not good at math.  When the other kids said to me, “Congratulations. You’re a dummy like the rest of us. We are all dummies here. Welcome to the dummies class.” I fought. I refused to be labelled a dummy. I wound up back in the advanced math class.

My mother wasn’t much help. When I returned to college as an engineering major she said, “You don’t have the brains for that. Your father can do that. You can’t.” I was reduced to tears. My father got angry and told me not to listen to her. I realized I was really good at math and truly enjoyed it in college. I was scoring ahead of class average through Calculus 2 and I remember how beautiful an integration across two chalkboards was. The jumble of numbers and letters almost danced.

As supportive as my father was he was still surprised. When I found vector analysis intriguing, he said, “You are not doing vector analysis. I do that.” When I insisted I was learning it he asked me to explain it to him. His response was, “I always thought my sons would be doing that, not my daughter. Awesome.” I’ve been lucky to have a lot of good role models. My first cousin, Donna Livant, is an accomplished cancer researcher doing ground-breaking work at her Oncology lab at the University of Michigan. And she is married with a family.

I wonder how many stereotypes arise from a misunderstanding of the different interaction and learning styles between the genders. In addition to a perceived lack of ability women are not viewed as capable of teamwork. My current department is one of the best-kept secrets in the technology field. More than 50% of the management are women as well as the workforce. In the technical field teamwork is not just good for productivity — its a survival skill.

I take a nearly perverse delight in breaking stereotypes.  Trailblazing is not always comfortable, but I find the rewards far outweigh the challenges. I am not living in anyone else’s shadow. Currently, I have the privilege of being asked to be in a series of videos published by Bridge Technical Talent to mentor and foster children’s interests in the technical field. Will this kill the pesky stereotypes? I hope so.

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imagesDear Reader,

The 10 Best-Kept Secrets of being a woman in the technical field:

  1. You have the freedom to be as independent as you want to be.
  2. We struggle with the same challenges as men.  It’s NOT always because we are women.
  3. We CAN all get along.   We DO understand teamwork.
  4. We get to create our identities — it hasn’t been done before.  We are the pioneers and we are the creator of dreams.
  5. Playing with computers is fun.
  6. We are as smart as men — and they don’t mind us being so.
  7. We are treated equally as men when we work hard.
  8. We are paid equally when we ask for what we are worth.
  9. No one cares how pretty or plain we are.
  10. And the best kept secret of all… No line at the ladies’ room!   The men have to wait!

Dear Reader,

This past weekend, I had a great adventure.   I hopped a Peter Pan out of Providence to New York City — all alone.  Lost my mind?   A single woman alone going into the big city?   Maybe.   However, I am queen of urban travel.   I live in Providence and walk home alone at night.   I go into Boston and out to Waltham all by myself all the time.

If you dropped me off in the middle of a forest with a compass and all the tools necessary for survival you would still never see me alive again.   It is a really good thing that Lewis and Clark weren’t relying on me to guide them across unexplored America.   We would not have a country.  However, you can drop me off in the middle of a city with minimal resources and I’ll flourish.

I came up out of the Port Authority smack dab in the middle of Times Square.   The sight that captivated me held me transfixed and I was in love.   No pictures or images on televesion prepared me for the lights and the life of New York on a Friday night.   I spent the night walking the city and talking to others out sightseeing and socializing.   It’s true.   New York is the city that never sleeps.

I also had a reason to be there.   I was heading to the Micrsoft New York City Code Camp Saturday morning at Pace University which happened to be a short trip by train from there.    But that is another blog post….


Dear Reader,

For those of you Steampunk Fans… First, a fashion show!

How To Make Steampunk Clothes ~ Videos and Tutorials!

http://www.threadbanger.com/ispydiy/episode/iST_20080826/how-to-make-steampunk-goggles-threadbanger

Steampunk Events!

http://www.steampunk.com/events/conventions/

http://nescifievents.org/?tag=steampunk

http://www.threadbanger.com/episode/THR_20080829

http://wingsofsteam.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=66