imageDear Reader,

“Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.”
―     Apple Inc.

Steve Jobs was a visionary.  He resurrected Apple from the dead, he successfully competed against Microsoft, and he innovated culture.  The naysayers could not tarnish Apple’s reputation.   I remember the line outside the retail store on a Friday night waiting for the latest iPhone.   Apple managed to build up a fan following similar to a popular band — that line was reminiscent of people lining up to get tickets to a sold-out show.

2010’s headlines included:

What of Apple today?   Two years into “The Year of Jobs?”

2013’s headlines include:

Additionally, Apple’s stock is not remaining strong and its new product launch at this year’s WWDC met with lukewarm reviews.  I’m left wondering, WWSD (What Would Steve Do)?   We don’t know.   Is this turn of events the beginning of a downward trend for Apple?  Apple users are a tremendously loyal bunch — almost to the point of a cult-like following to an iconic brand.   A good bit of that has to do with the exceptional customer service and support at the retail stores.

However; if Jamie Dihiansan, a self-admitted life-long Apple Guru found reason to switch to PCs, what of less involved individuals?  Apple products have become average among the competitors they inspired.  What is tragic is that Apple would attempt to damage Samsung in a lawsuit rather than raise itself to new excellence on its own merits.  Cruel irony would be that Apple crumbles as Steve Jobs commented on in 2004.

“And how are monopolies lost? Think about it. Some very good product people invent some very good products, and the company achieves a monopoly. But after that, the product people aren’t the ones that drive the company forward anymore. It’s the marketing guys or the ones who expand the business into Latin America or whatever. Because what’s the point of focusing on making the product even better when the only company you can take business from is yourself? So a different group of people start to move up. And who usually ends up running the show? The sales guy. John Akers at IBM is the consummate example. Then one day, the monopoly expires for whatever reason. But by then the best product people have left, or they’re no longer listened to. And so the company goes through this tumultuous time, and it either survives or it doesn’t. Look at Microsoft — who’s running Microsoft? (interviewer: Steve Ballmer.) Right, the sales guy. Case closed. And that’s what happened at Apple, as well.” – Steve Jobs, Business Week.

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